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As If For A Thousand YearsAs If For A Thousand Years

 

As If For A Thousand Years

'From the earliest settlement struggles to the bloody Eureka stockade, public land use has excited the passions and fury of the general population.'

In 2006, the Victorian Environmental Assessment Council published a history of its predecessors, the Land Conservation Council and Environment Conservation Council, called As If for A Thousand Years and written by Dr Danielle Clode.

The book exposes the history of public land use changes in Victoria, along with the colourful characters, heated politics and successes of the organisations that helped to shape the uses.

The story follows how the Land Conservation Council and later the Environment Conservation Council became leading models for community consultation, surviving dramatic changes to the political and environmental landscape.

Author Dr Danielle Clode has a BA in politics and psychology and completed her doctorate in conservation biology as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford. Her interest in the environment stems from a childhood spent sailing to remote corners of the south-east Australian coast. She now works as a science writer and is author of Killers in Eden and Continent of Curiosities: A journey through Australian Natural History. She lives on a bush block outside Melbourne with her husband and two daughters.

Synopsis:

When Bill Borthwick, Minister for Lands, delivered his welcoming speech to the newly formed Land Conservation Council in 1971, he advised them to make their recommendations on public land use for Victoria "as if for a thousand years". And with that he left them to it.

The Land Conservation Council was to provide a unique framework free from political intervention, where experts could debate public land use issues and recommend fair and balanced public land use, enshrining a representative reserve system for Victoria's remaining natural heritage. This is the story of the Land Conservation Council and how it developed into a leading model for community consultation, surviving dramatic changes to the political and environmental landscape but, despite name changes, remaining a stable and conciliatory force in the battle over public land in Victoria.

Available from the Victorian Environmental Assessment Council